June 24th- It's time for our Friday Highlights! You can check them out here!

Last book you've read?

Comments

  • PriestessDreadfulPriestessDreadful Posts: 229 Member
    I had some minor criticisms of this inside my head, but overall I enjoyed it.

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/43599925-the-kill-club

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  • Sammytrey00Sammytrey00 Posts: 17 New Member
    I’ve read a book called "Little Women" by Louise May Alcott. The novel is about four sisters, their life, friendship, growing up. In short, for me it’s a one-time book. Of course, today the book will seem very boring for modern young girls. There is not even a storyline here. Description of their boring measured life, their worries, children's desires. Although it would be useful for them to read, because children's selfishness is still relevant today. This book is also suitable for a more adult female audience, there is something to think about child-rearing. The story is not modern at all, and the book is not very exciting, but I do not regret having read it. A recommendation only for lovers of women's classics.
  • GalacticGalGalacticGal Posts: 21,454 Member
    edited June 2021
    I’ve read a book called "Little Women" by Louise May Alcott. The novel is about four sisters, their life, friendship, growing up. In short, for me it’s a one-time book. Of course, today the book will seem very boring for modern young girls. There is not even a storyline here. Description of their boring measured life, their worries, children's desires. Although it would be useful for them to read, because children's selfishness is still relevant today. This book is also suitable for a more adult female audience, there is something to think about child-rearing. The story is not modern at all, and the book is not very exciting, but I do not regret having read it. A recommendation only for lovers of women's classics.

    I read books of that nature to get a better feel of what times were like in the setting of the story. What's boring for some is fascinating for others. I really hate, for instance, how it was decided to modernize the Classic Nancy Drew Mystery Series. I had a couple of volumes that belonged to my mother, with the blue binding. Both stories were a full twenty-five chapters. They ended up truncating the stories in the then newer version, which was the yellow binding that I was busy building my collection from. They consisted of a whole twenty chapters. Later on, it was decided that Nancy Drew would become a girl of 'today'. They changed so much I refused to introduce my own daughter to the series.

    I liked those blue-bound copies the best. Gave me a feel of what the 1940s were really like. I enjoy being transported through time whether it's the past or futuristic. I don't see "Gone With the Wind" as some do in modern times. I call it a slice of how life used to be. Mind you, I don't approve of slavery, but it is what it is. We can't simply erase our past, but we are called to improve our future with the knowledge gained.
    Post edited by GalacticGal on
    You can download (free) all three volumes of my Night Whispers Star Trek Fanfiction here: http://galacticgal.deviantart.com/gallery/ You'll need to have a pdf reader. New websites: http://www.trekkiefanfiction.com/st-tos.php
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  • SleepstarSleepstar Posts: 720 Member
    The last book I read was a photo book about my favourite football team (The book also had descriptions of the match the photo was taken and also a glimpse of how much the game evolved. Two of the pages was basically the summary of the team's unbeaten run in the League, which today would be quite impossible as the Premier League has since became more Competitive)
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  • NushnushganayNushnushganay Posts: 9,418 Member
    I’ve read a book called "Little Women" by Louise May Alcott. The novel is about four sisters, their life, friendship, growing up. In short, for me it’s a one-time book. Of course, today the book will seem very boring for modern young girls. There is not even a storyline here. Description of their boring measured life, their worries, children's desires. Although it would be useful for them to read, because children's selfishness is still relevant today. This book is also suitable for a more adult female audience, there is something to think about child-rearing. The story is not modern at all, and the book is not very exciting, but I do not regret having read it. A recommendation only for lovers of women's classics.

    I read it as a kid, about age 10, and it interested me, though I have to admit that Little Men interested me far more, but both have to be seen knowing that they are passed through the lens of their time and are great examples of the moralizing of certain definitions of virtue peculiar to the time, so it's important as with all literature, to separate for ourselves the wheat from the chaff and ponder the social, political, philosophical perspectives of the author's culture and era.

    One theme neatly captured and worth discussing was the glamorization of tuberculosis (called consumption then) indirectly, as it was a serious public health concern that did indeed cause wasting and was, weirdly, embroidered into the cult of femininity in very unhealthy ways, giving rise to the elevation of extreme pallor, thinness, and weakness as romantically desirable conditions for women.

    But it was also somewhat ahead of its time in depicting the March sisters as human beings, more or less, with personalities, dreams, fears, ambitions of their own (such as society allowed them: basically, marriage) and Jo's struggle in particular with being divergent to the gender norms of her society. In that way it could be seen as daring and progressive, for Jo as a character struggled in her identity and treatment by society, but was not punished for it by the author: she found someone who loved her as she was, and they were successful in running a boarding home for (mostly) boys.

    The last book I read was the works of Edgar Allen Poe. Was revisiting his short stories for the first time since my early teens.
    Racism is EVERYONE's fight #BLM #StopAsianHate
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  • rubyskywalkerrubyskywalker Posts: 1,174 Member
    Currently reading High School Musical The Musical The Series book The Road Trip. Supposed to read it after finishing season one and before starting to watch season two but I didn't find out about the book until after I started watching season two. Oops!
    Origin ID and TS3 Username: DollyGizzy
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  • maggiemae8135maggiemae8135 Posts: 331 Member
    I read all types of books but right now just finished the 4 books in Mary Stewart's series about Merlin and King Arthur. I have read it years ago but wanted to reread it. Now I am starting to reread The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley.
  • BMSOBMSO Posts: 3,234 Member
    I'm currently reading The Bloody Red Baron by Kim Newman. I haven't read that book since high school it's a good read.
    Bmso85's emporium - mysims4studios

  • SimburianSimburian Posts: 6,759 Member
    edited June 2021
    I read all types of books but right now just finished the 4 books in Mary Stewart's series about Merlin and King Arthur. I have read it years ago but wanted to reread it. Now I am starting to reread The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley.


    I need some soothing reads during this Pandemic, nothing horrific of scary. I can't cope with classic writers like Dickens or moderns at the moment.

    I've read almost all of Mary Stewart's mysteries but not the Merlin series but now going back to old detective series like Ngaio Marsh, and discovering ones I missed years' ago writers, like Cyril Hare and Colin Watson. Hare was a barrister so his plots were based around quirks in British law at the times he wrote, 30's to 50's and Colin Watson set his police detective in an English seaside town of Flaxborough with some surprising goings on from those who rule it. The BBC made a series of them years ago. If you want to know what England was like in those times I can recommend them.

    I've have also scared myself a bit silly by reading a new UFO book, "Trinity" by Jacques Vallee, a leading UFO researcher about a UFO that came down in 1945 two years before the Roswell one and a couple of weeks after the Nuclear Bomb test in the US, before Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Two young boys saw it all. 👽👽👽
  • MagicKaitBallMagicKaitBall Posts: 21 Member
    I have recently read "They Both Die at the End" and a book on astrology
  • Deshong04Deshong04 Posts: 4,239 Member
    The Legend of Drizzt Book XIII: Sea of Swords

    Now that I'm finished the whole Legend of Drizzt series, now I'll be moving on to The Sellswords trilogy and so on. I'm excited to read about Jarlaxle and Artemis adventures. I wonder if they will cross paths again with the Companions of the Hall? I will find out once I read it, can't wait.
    “I do not like to consider this a possibility, for if humans on as large a scale are capable of eliminating empathy and sympathy so completely as to actually enjoy the spectacle of watching another suffer horribly, then that, I fear, is the truest definition of evil.” –Drizzt Do’Urden
  • CalicoShoesCalicoShoes Posts: 6 New Member
    I just finished the Grisha trilogy by Leigh Bardugo--Shadow and Bone, Siege and Storm, and Ruin and Rising. I really enjoyed the Netflix Shadow and Bones series but couldn't wait for season two to find out what happens! The worldbuilding in the books is really good. Excited to start Six of Crows now.
  • comicsforlifecomicsforlife Posts: 9,205 Member
    edited July 2021
    last knight on earth by scott snyder
    its a batman story about the end of the world
    it was really good
    the sims 4 isn't getting new whims right now and I think they have dropped them all together if we want new whims in sims 4 we need to tweet the gurus and tell them we like whims
  • comicsforlifecomicsforlife Posts: 9,205 Member
    I’ve read a book called "Little Women" by Louise May Alcott. The novel is about four sisters, their life, friendship, growing up. In short, for me it’s a one-time book. Of course, today the book will seem very boring for modern young girls. There is not even a storyline here. Description of their boring measured life, their worries, children's desires. Although it would be useful for them to read, because children's selfishness is still relevant today. This book is also suitable for a more adult female audience, there is something to think about child-rearing. The story is not modern at all, and the book is not very exciting, but I do not regret having read it. A recommendation only for lovers of women's classics.

    I read it as a kid, about age 10, and it interested me, though I have to admit that Little Men interested me far more, but both have to be seen knowing that they are passed through the lens of their time and are great examples of the moralizing of certain definitions of virtue peculiar to the time, so it's important as with all literature, to separate for ourselves the wheat from the chaff and ponder the social, political, philosophical perspectives of the author's culture and era.

    One theme neatly captured and worth discussing was the glamorization of tuberculosis (called consumption then) indirectly, as it was a serious public health concern that did indeed cause wasting and was, weirdly, embroidered into the cult of femininity in very unhealthy ways, giving rise to the elevation of extreme pallor, thinness, and weakness as romantically desirable conditions for women.

    But it was also somewhat ahead of its time in depicting the March sisters as human beings, more or less, with personalities, dreams, fears, ambitions of their own (such as society allowed them: basically, marriage) and Jo's struggle in particular with being divergent to the gender norms of her society. In that way it could be seen as daring and progressive, for Jo as a character struggled in her identity and treatment by society, but was not punished for it by the author: she found someone who loved her as she was, and they were successful in running a boarding home for (mostly) boys.

    The last book I read was the works of Edgar Allen Poe. Was revisiting his short stories for the first time since my early teens.

    I didn't like little women much when it comes to classics I liked kidnapped and a little princess way better @Nushnushganay
    the sims 4 isn't getting new whims right now and I think they have dropped them all together if we want new whims in sims 4 we need to tweet the gurus and tell them we like whims
  • NushnushganayNushnushganay Posts: 9,418 Member
    I’ve read a book called "Little Women" by Louise May Alcott. The novel is about four sisters, their life, friendship, growing up. In short, for me it’s a one-time book. Of course, today the book will seem very boring for modern young girls. There is not even a storyline here. Description of their boring measured life, their worries, children's desires. Although it would be useful for them to read, because children's selfishness is still relevant today. This book is also suitable for a more adult female audience, there is something to think about child-rearing. The story is not modern at all, and the book is not very exciting, but I do not regret having read it. A recommendation only for lovers of women's classics.

    I read it as a kid, about age 10, and it interested me, though I have to admit that Little Men interested me far more, but both have to be seen knowing that they are passed through the lens of their time and are great examples of the moralizing of certain definitions of virtue peculiar to the time, so it's important as with all literature, to separate for ourselves the wheat from the chaff and ponder the social, political, philosophical perspectives of the author's culture and era.

    One theme neatly captured and worth discussing was the glamorization of tuberculosis (called consumption then) indirectly, as it was a serious public health concern that did indeed cause wasting and was, weirdly, embroidered into the cult of femininity in very unhealthy ways, giving rise to the elevation of extreme pallor, thinness, and weakness as romantically desirable conditions for women.

    But it was also somewhat ahead of its time in depicting the March sisters as human beings, more or less, with personalities, dreams, fears, ambitions of their own (such as society allowed them: basically, marriage) and Jo's struggle in particular with being divergent to the gender norms of her society. In that way it could be seen as daring and progressive, for Jo as a character struggled in her identity and treatment by society, but was not punished for it by the author: she found someone who loved her as she was, and they were successful in running a boarding home for (mostly) boys.

    The last book I read was the works of Edgar Allen Poe. Was revisiting his short stories for the first time since my early teens.

    I didn't like little women much when it comes to classics I liked kidnapped and a little princess way better @Nushnushganay

    Frances Hodgson Burnett was a good author, and I remember The Little Princess and The Secret Garden as very engrossing adventure stories when I read them at about 10 or 11. They were faster paced and less moralistic than Louisa May Alcott, that's for sure.
    Racism is EVERYONE's fight #BLM #StopAsianHate
    Let's make Liberty and Justice For All a reality.

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  • GalacticGalGalacticGal Posts: 21,454 Member
    edited July 2021
    The last book I've read recently was entitled: Valentine's Blood. It was a Christmas present, which I gratefully accepted. It suggested by the sub-title: The story of John and Valentine Sevier that is was about my sixth great-grandfather. Sadly, it should have been labeled FICTION. And John's name should have been totally left off the front cover (and by the way they used a portrait of John, too). The story was fraught with errors and wasn't even a good historical fiction, if I may add. I was engaged, to a point, but then reflected on the absurdities presented. First off, the author (if truly a descendent of Valentine, Jr.) got it all wrong. Yes, John Sevier is the "Rock Star" of the family as he was clearly the most famous. But to suggest that his next younger brother had it so much harder, is a farce. Their father, Valentine didn't lose everything he had, nor did Valentine, Jr. have to become a Long Hunter just to support the family while John was sent to further his education. All of the sons were sent off to Staunton Academy, (basically high school) not just John. John declined going off to university (which were few in the colonies at that time) because he was in love with the eldest daughter of Joseph Hawkins, a close family friend. Too little of it was even about John. Nobody came to comfort him when his first wife died.

    According to what this author presented, John and Valentine, Jr. sat around smoking one evening while discussing the problems in the Settlements and the need to expand land-ownership. John disliked tobacco so much, not only didn't he smoke, but he refused to even try his hand at growing it — tobacco was highly lucrative and would have helped him out financially. Instead, he took furs as his pay, since he was by then in the government of the Settlements. Not to sing the praises of my direct ancestor too highly, but the author clearly had an ax to grind.
    You can download (free) all three volumes of my Night Whispers Star Trek Fanfiction here: http://galacticgal.deviantart.com/gallery/ You'll need to have a pdf reader. New websites: http://www.trekkiefanfiction.com/st-tos.php
    http://www.getfreeebooks.com/star-trek-original-series-fan-fiction-trilogy/
  • jentom97jentom97 Posts: 4 New Member
    Exit Wounds by Rutu Modan, it's a graphic novel aka a comic book lol
  • EmerySnickettEmerySnickett Posts: 42 Member
    "The Beginners Guide To Alchemy" by Sarah Durn
  • simgirl1010simgirl1010 Posts: 26,982 Member
    Currently reading Billy Summers by Stephen King.
    Don't forget to smile today. 🌞
    She/Her
  • ElliandreElliandre Posts: 2,468 Member
    Hamlet - Shakespeare
  • Verity15Verity15 Posts: 179 Member
    I've been reading the chronicles of Narnia but it's taking me forever I really struggle with reading for some reason🤦🏻‍♀️🙄

    I just finished reading the lion, the witch and the wardrobe
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