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Can somebody explain this game to me

To7mTo7m Posts: 5,459 Member
edited April 9 in The Sims Medieval
So I was recently gifted this on origin, and I’m in two minds. It *looks* good. But I like the life simulation aspect of the sims. I don’t mind following the odd quest or mission if it is actually going to result in some sort of game changing outcome, but I also want to “live” life in medieval times, getting married, having babies etc.

Is that possible in this game or it is strictly a RPG type thing?

Cheers.

—T

Comments

  • Sigzy05Sigzy05 Posts: 19,385 Member
    It's a weird mix. It's fun though.
  • To7mTo7m Posts: 5,459 Member
    Sigzy05 wrote: »
    It's a weird mix. It's fun though.


    Hmm. Might have to just give it a go.

    —T
  • CinebarCinebar Posts: 33,064 Member
    edited April 11
    Life simulator, not so much. The object of the game is to fill the ambition that is open to you. In order to unlock the next ambition/world/quests. If you do try to play this as some sort of life simulator, you will not have any control over a spouse and or any children you make them have. You can call them home but can do very little about making sure they have eaten or anything else. You can follow them (blue plumbbob) across the map very easily but that is about it.

    If you do decide to make one of your heroes marry or become involved with a townie or another hero etc. you can wind up messing up the game, and or particular quests. But there are ways around it in some cases but not many. Such as if you had your king or queen marry a townie then they are going to need a divorce to be able to marry a particular Sim in a later quest. Which you may have to do depending on which quests and Ambition you are playing at the time. That leaves you in a pickle, since they are already married, because the player wanted to play this as some sort of life simulator.

    The thing to do here is to add a church and hero so that the monarch can request a divorce to be able to fill a particular quest (like Heir to the Throne). This in turn (by adding a church) can increase culture etc. which by playing in some of the Ambitions the culture is required to remain very low...so it's best not to even let the monarch get married to anyone until you wind up in freemode which is unlocked later after so many Ambitions are filled/completed.

    The game only has two motives, Hunger and Energy. All other things you do only exist in game to build up focus and put the Sim/hero in a better 'mood' such as using a pot to pee and or a tub to bathe. Those things aren't even necessary in TSM but good to have when the Sim is not in the 'green' and you need to build that up so they can have more focus and that way they can actually complete a quest In Platinum and that is the main goal to complete each quest in Platinum, which in turn gives you more RP to spend to build more buildings and to better the kingdom and to be able to finish an Ambition In Platinum so you can actually unlock the next. It is almost impossible to unlock the next Ambition if you don't finish the previous one in Platinum.

    It's better not to marry off one hero to the next since they will return back to their own homes but do get a boost for having a significant other and are in a green mood for much longer but just causes problems down the road when you want to play in freemode.

    In freemode if you switch between heroes you will still get messages about the last one you played so it's best just to stick with one hero in freemode and not switch to another unless you want messages about them all just like if you were playing a quest that required multiple heroes.

    So, no, not much room to play this game like a normal life simulator without maybe messing up a quest you will later need to do, and or messing up an Ambition you will need to unlock later.

    Other examples, be careful who you throw in the pit, or the stocks. Like don't throw the constable into the pit, the game won't generate another like The Sims generates NPCs. You will need him often. And make sure when you are questing you don't do anything or hook up with anyone that is part of a quest, that will ruin most quests.

    "Games Are Not The Place To Tell Stories, Games Are Meant To Let People Tell Their Own Stories"...Will Wright.

    https://forums.thesims.com/en_US/discussion/958714/cinebar-custom-content-clothes-updating-links/p1


  • FinvolaFinvola Posts: 930 Member
    It is mostly quest based but you can also play them in free mode, either through cheats or by unlocking it after completing the quests.
  • Calico45Calico45 Posts: 1,606 Member
    It is a mix, but I do feel like you live your life around the quest sagas. As mentioned, there is a free mode and there are cheats to play around with. It is not nearly as freeform as the main series, but it has a lot of personality and I consider it an underappreciated gem. I think it actually has more RPG potential than the main series, even if you play as the watcher.

    Also, I have heard of bugs and quest locks and things and have experienced my own number of heartbreaks, but I love the game and no quest has ever been too long or hard to redo. I haven't had nearly the trouble that apparently some have had, but I have not exactly been hopping from bed to bed in the kingdom or purging the populace either.

    The needs are fairly easy to keep up with. It is more simple, but to keep their focus up will have to do more tending than just food and sleep. I also recommend going out of your way to buy ingredients to have more than gruel, but gruel works.

    What annoys me about this system is that I have honestly had to draw out the quest to get platinum before. The bar does not fill quickly enough sometimes, so there is encouragement to "live your life" around quests because otherwise you can sometimes shoot through it and not get platinum.

    As for family, it has been noted that you are allowed a spouse and two children. Four, if your other spouse is a hero, but the other two cannot be in your household. You also do not control them unless you die, upon which your child becomes your successor. Speaking of death, there are very real consequences, like sending your kid to the forest too often can get them eaten by a bear, but that is one of the things I appreciate about Medieval. You should learn to spot the death flags fairly quickly.
  • SERVERFRASERVERFRA Posts: 4,560 Member
    Sims Medieval is sort of Sims 3 meets Civilization III.
  • BettyNewbie1BettyNewbie1 Posts: 283 Member
    Cinebar wrote: »
    Life simulator, not so much. you will not have any control over a spouse and or any children you make them have.
    Relieve when I see this. You don't know how many times I've tried to put spouses and children as roommates in The Sims 4.
  • historyfreak1historyfreak1 Posts: 16 Member
    The Sims Medieval is the game I play when I am out of story ideas to play in the other Sims games. Sometimes I just want to play according to someone else's story line.

    It is more of an RPG quest based game than the Sims but no less interesting in my opinion. I was watching a YouTube video where LGR reviewed it and he described it as similar to the Sims 2 story series (Castaway Stories and the like). Not sure if you have played these and know what I am talking about.

    It is more structured than the Sims games in that you have quests to complete and achievements to keep up with. You can only play more than one sim if the quest calls for it.

    It still is a really fun game and the stories/quests are very entertaining. I'd say give it a try.

    Hope that helps!
  • historyfreak1historyfreak1 Posts: 16 Member
    > @Calico45 said:
    > It is a mix, but I do feel like you live your life around the quest sagas. As mentioned, there is a free mode and there are cheats to play around with. It is not nearly as freeform as the main series, but it has a lot of personality and I consider it an underappreciated gem. I think it actually has more RPG potential than the main series, even if you play as the watcher.
    >
    > Also, I have heard of bugs and quest locks and things and have experienced my own number of heartbreaks, but I love the game and no quest has ever been too long or hard to redo. I haven't had nearly the trouble that apparently some have had, but I have not exactly been hopping from bed to bed in the kingdom or purging the populace either.
    >
    > The needs are fairly easy to keep up with. It is more simple, but to keep their focus up will have to do more tending than just food and sleep. I also recommend going out of your way to buy ingredients to have more than gruel, but gruel works.
    >
    > What annoys me about this system is that I have honestly had to draw out the quest to get platinum before. The bar does not fill quickly enough sometimes, so there is encouragement to "live your life" around quests because otherwise you can sometimes shoot through it and not get platinum.
    >
    > As for family, it has been noted that you are allowed a spouse and two children. Four, if your other spouse is a hero, but the other two cannot be in your household. You also do not control them unless you die, upon which your child becomes your successor. Speaking of death, there are very real consequences, like sending your kid to the forest too often can get them eaten by a bear, but that is one of the things I appreciate about Medieval. You should learn to spot the death flags fairly quickly.

    Interesting, I never knew about the kid getting eaten by a bear if they go to the forest too often.
  • SindocatSindocat Posts: 5,445 Member
    And older thread, but see here for my overview.
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