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Should The Sims start catering more for the AFOTS?

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Comments

  • SERVERFRASERVERFRA Posts: 1,138 Member
    How is it that clothing with riska very revealing low cut is allowed but not a funny sim jumping out of a cake.
  • OldeseadoggeOldeseadogge Posts: 2,466 Member
    The same inconsistent 'logic' that says dog houes are bad. They may try to defend themselves by saying that one is player choice and less blatent than the cake version. Problem with that is with the asset in game, it can easily appear (and in highly inappropriate situations) by the game, no player input involved.
  • king_of_simcity7king_of_simcity7 Posts: 24,089 Member
    This is a good point. After all, even though LEGO is a company which primarily makes products for kids roughly 3 years old to 12 years old, they still do a lot for their adult fans too. They make advanced building kits with thousands of pieces that sell at a price point that only adults and working teens can afford, they sponsor building contests, they support artists who use LEGO bricks as their primary medium. In their LEGO films, they reference classic sets and older LEGO media (like the Gold Ninja joke in the Ninjago movie). They appreciate all of the fans, young and old, who've played with LEGO bricks over the generations, and they try to keep not just the kids and the teens and adults who are still into LEGO, but also older people who may not have touched anything LEGO in 15 or 20 years, but still have fond memories and warm feelings attached to the brand happy.

    EA could and should be that way with The Sims: making sure that the game maintains that "T" rating so that kids can still buy it with their birthday money, but also keeping it challenging and exciting for adult fans of the series as well. There are lots of "T"-rated games that have a lot more edge and drama to them than TS4. Many of them are JRPG's, but still. Maintaining the "T" rating and making a game that kids can have fun with doesn't necessarily mean taking the fat out of the biscuit for older players. Most Final Fantasy games have the "T" rating, but also seriously tackle hard subjects like religion, politics, revenge, environmentalism, the value and meaning of life, what it is to be a person, racism, crime, and more. Even after shifting the battle system to "we don't feel like making a proper turn-based system, so let's just slap Kingdom Hearts' combat on it and call it a day," they still aren't afraid to "go there" with the stories. Imagine if Square/SquareEnix had decided, somewhere along the way, to make all FF stories "American Saturday Morning Time Slot Friendly as Recommended By 4Kids Entertainment." The series would have taken a terrible hit.

    With a long-running series, you can't forget about your long-time fans. LEGO knows that, SquareEnix knows that...but EA has yet to learn this lesson.

    It is said that Lego where losing a lot of sales in the 2000s. I think they changed how they looked at things. It is clear that TS4 had a slower start than hoped and so EA should take a leaf out of Lego's book in order to survive the long term.

    Both TS2 and TS3 where successful as they still catered to traditional players while trying new features out as well. TS4 shut out a lot of players hence the slow sales.

    20 years is a long time for a lot of players. We brought the first game, funded the second and by buying that we funded the third and the forth.

    Why should I fund the fifth when the forth was thrown back in my face?
    Simbourne
    screenshot_original.jpg
  • ClarionOfJoyClarionOfJoy Posts: 697 Member
    This is a good point. After all, even though LEGO is a company which primarily makes products for kids roughly 3 years old to 12 years old, they still do a lot for their adult fans too. They make advanced building kits with thousands of pieces that sell at a price point that only adults and working teens can afford, they sponsor building contests, they support artists who use LEGO bricks as their primary medium. In their LEGO films, they reference classic sets and older LEGO media (like the Gold Ninja joke in the Ninjago movie). They appreciate all of the fans, young and old, who've played with LEGO bricks over the generations, and they try to keep not just the kids and the teens and adults who are still into LEGO, but also older people who may not have touched anything LEGO in 15 or 20 years, but still have fond memories and warm feelings attached to the brand happy.

    EA could and should be that way with The Sims: making sure that the game maintains that "T" rating so that kids can still buy it with their birthday money, but also keeping it challenging and exciting for adult fans of the series as well. There are lots of "T"-rated games that have a lot more edge and drama to them than TS4. Many of them are JRPG's, but still. Maintaining the "T" rating and making a game that kids can have fun with doesn't necessarily mean taking the fat out of the biscuit for older players. Most Final Fantasy games have the "T" rating, but also seriously tackle hard subjects like religion, politics, revenge, environmentalism, the value and meaning of life, what it is to be a person, racism, crime, and more. Even after shifting the battle system to "we don't feel like making a proper turn-based system, so let's just slap Kingdom Hearts' combat on it and call it a day," they still aren't afraid to "go there" with the stories. Imagine if Square/SquareEnix had decided, somewhere along the way, to make all FF stories "American Saturday Morning Time Slot Friendly as Recommended By 4Kids Entertainment." The series would have taken a terrible hit.

    With a long-running series, you can't forget about your long-time fans. LEGO knows that, SquareEnix knows that...but EA has yet to learn this lesson.


    I agree. Leadership at EA changed in 2013 though and things are so different now with the way they handle their games and their loyal customers. The old leadership before that was pretty cut-throat with the game studios it acquired, but game quality was excellent (Dragon Age: Origins, Mass Effect, Dead Space, The Sims 2 and 3, The Saboteur) and they treated their customers well (generous content in their games, great free incentives if you pre-ordered, special events were truly special).

    I don't think the new leadership will learn anything though. They still have other games that do very well, like the FIFA series.


    ----

    In regard to the title of this thread, I agree, The Sims should start catering to the AFOTS. It was like that before with all the previous iterations and none of the kids who grew up playing those games got screwed up in the head or whatever, lol!

  • DijktafoneDijktafone Posts: 553 Member
    As an AFOTS, I know exactly what I'm missing here in TS4, but I would pay to have. Something as deep as TS3 'Roaring heights', which was IMO a success in terms of adult content, without being visually inappropriate for x age.
    In that hood, you had several bad mariages in an era (1920's to 1940's) where divorce wasn't commonplace as today, which led to deceit, but also the family struggles of a widow, hidden homosexuality for status reasons, and so on...

    In TS4, there's not a single adult-themed setup that comes at the top of my head; something I personally miss.

    For the visuals, that's a different story. Yes, I'd personally like the cake-girl, or the 'goose' (that 🌺🌺🌺🌺 goose :D ) to make a comeback, but some of the things we'd like to see might very well force them to change their 'T rating' in 2020, as opposed to the 3 previous entries eras.
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