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Upcoming EP: High School

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  • MichelleWMichelleW Posts: 665 Member
    I was not expecting the amusement park stuff but I think it is a great addition. EA could still produce a theme park pack in the future. I did a thread on Roaring Heights that gave several ideas for a theme park style pack and there is also a thread about doing a Renaissance faire type pack. It could still happen.
  • crocobauracrocobaura Posts: 7,380 Member

    The necklace with the heart pendant is not new. But I love the new hair.
  • catloverplayercatloverplayer Posts: 93,395 Member
    crocobaura wrote: »

    The necklace with the heart pendant is not new. But I love the new hair.

    I've never seen a pink color so it has to be new.
  • ReaganboganReaganbogan Posts: 278 Member
    crocobaura wrote: »

    The necklace with the heart pendant is not new. But I love the new hair.

    I've never seen a pink color so it has to be new.

    Looks like rose gold option we have.

    Loving the eye makeup w/rhinestones
  • GoldmoldarGoldmoldar Posts: 11,966 Member
    Right now, I am liking what I am seeing but as always depending on reviews and how well the livestream does. As I love wolves, I also like anything school related. However I am wondering like in the movie with Michael J. Fox can you make a wolve that can go to school If that can be done that is a bonus. :) So many ideas popping up. :)
    Omen by HP Intel®️ Core™️ i9- 12900K W/ RGB Liquid Cooler 32GB Nvidia RTX 3080 10Gb ASUS Ultra-Wide 34" Curved Monitor. Omen By HP Intel® Core™ i7-12800HX 32 GB Nvidia 3070 Ti 8 GB 17.3 Screen
  • GracieO312GracieO312 Posts: 1,292 Member
    I love the look of this pack and I'm so happy that I have actually recieved two packs this year that I voted for in the surveys/community stuff pack votes (high schools and weddings). I am witholding my purchase of High School Years as I want to see how everything functions in the livestream first (e.g. how rotational play works/if you can build your own high schools etc).

    What is killing the vibe a teenie weenie bit for me, however, is the obvious lack of those beautiful, iconic, shiny yellow school buses... such a shame! Such a shame!

    One day maybe... one day!
  • loubyloulouloubyloulou Posts: 4,466 Member
    crocobaura wrote: »

    The necklace with the heart pendant is not new. But I love the new hair.

    I've never seen a pink color so it has to be new.

    Looks like rose gold option we have.

    Loving the eye makeup w/rhinestones

    Yeah, it's base game - a rose gold.
  • manicobsessivemanicobsessive Posts: 1,110 Member
    I wonder how things are going to work when you have more than one teen? Will it be like careers when you can only follow one?
  • kaiwrysimskaiwrysims Posts: 1,532 Member

    I'm pretty sure we've had that necklace for awhile now
    Check out my twitter and tumblr
  • Atreya33Atreya33 Posts: 4,422 Member
    Just out of curiosity : are proposals actually a thing in the US? It seems a bit hard to believe people would actually kneel in front of some one like that in a full school hallway.
  • DaWaterRatDaWaterRat Posts: 3,353 Member
    Atreya33 wrote: »
    Just out of curiosity : are proposals actually a thing in the US? It seems a bit hard to believe people would actually kneel in front of some one like that in a full school hallway.

    Promposals have become a huge thing. I think they're cringeworthy, because they put extra pressure on the askee to say yes - kinda like those elaborate wedding proposals.

    I was helping my kid's drama club her senior year and one kid had arranged with the director to "skip ahead" in the planned rehearsal so that he could ask a girl to homecoming as part of the scene.
  • simgirl1010simgirl1010 Posts: 35,847 Member
    I don't know how popular they are now but 10 years ago my son asked his girlfriend to the prom with a promposal. I even helped him with the poster. :) There wasn't any kneeling involved. He did give her a gift but I can't remember what it was. :p

    And most of the participants are already dating so rejections aren't very common.



  • Atreya33Atreya33 Posts: 4,422 Member
    Just out of curiosity : are proposals actually a thing in the US? It seems a bit hard to believe people would actually kneel in front of some one like that in a full school hallway.
    DaWaterRat wrote: »
    Atreya33 wrote: »
    Just out of curiosity : are proposals actually a thing in the US? It seems a bit hard to believe people would actually kneel in front of some one like that in a full school hallway.

    Promposals have become a huge thing. I think they're cringeworthy, because they put extra pressure on the askee to say yes - kinda like those elaborate wedding proposals.

    I was helping my kid's drama club her senior year and one kid had arranged with the director to "skip ahead" in the planned rehearsal so that he could ask a girl to homecoming as part of the scene.

    The pressure to say yes must be awkward. Whenever I see one of those public elaborate wedding proposals (only seen them on TV) I am glad my husband popped the question when it was just the two of us.
    I don't know how popular they are now but 10 years ago my son asked his girlfriend to the prom with a promposal. I even helped him with the poster. :) There wasn't any kneeling involved. He did give her a gift but I can't remember what it was. :p

    And most of the participants are already dating so rejections aren't very common.

    It would make more sense to be already dating.

    Thank you for elaborating
  • simgirl1010simgirl1010 Posts: 35,847 Member
    Interesting article.

    The "Promposal" Is Everything That's Wrong With 2020 Teens & It Needs to Stop

    Sure, once upon a time, it was cute. Maybe you’d see a teenage boy run across a field hockey turf holding a poster that said “PROM?” written in a Sharpie. Sure, it was a creative way to ask his prospective date if they would go to the big event with him. But my, how the mighty-cute have fallen. These days, promposals have turned into a hassle, an extravagance, and an epic expense — especially for parents. And it’s this here parent’s opinion that “promposals” need to stop.

    First, there’s the financial factor. Somehow, “promposals” have become a rich kid’s game, with every “promposing” teen trying to one-up the next one in the opulence of their gesture — which has turned into some hefty spending in many cases. (Yes, teens have hired skywriters to post the four-letter question, and have called on celebrities to help them with the “big ask.”)

    In 2015, Visa estimated that the average American household spent $324 on promposals. As in, that’s what it costs just to ask another person to the dance. That doesn’t include the tickets, the dress, the dinner, the limo, or whatever else it takes to show up in style these days (something tells me that includes a lot more now than it did when I prommed it up in 1996.) And even if you, the parent, are not draining your own bank account in hopes that your kid will avoid teenage rejection overload, you may not want your child spending their hard-earned after-school-job money on a promposal either. Why? Because it’s an unnecessary extravagance. Right? (“Wrong,” your teen may likely contend. “It’s a societal norm.” Yikes.)

    Most parents want to help their children go to the prom, but finding money for things like a tuxedo rental or gown is stressful enough without a “promposal” to fund. But if parents think this is the moment they’ll teach their “promposing” kid the value of a dollar when they’re hellbent on an over-the-top “promposal” plus prom night with all the trimmings? Good luck. In fact, prom may end up needing to be the first time you and your child have to sit down to create a budget. Personally, I’d rather save that pivotal parent-teen discussion for trying to save for college. (Do they realize that’s right around the corner, too?)

    According to Visa, it costs $919 per couple on average to go to the prom. If teens — and/or their parents — are spending hundreds of dollars just asking the question, how much will they fork over for dresses, tuxes, flowers, limos and God-knows-what-else they do afterward?

    Yet another reason why promposals may drive you — and your teen — nuts? The stress a “promposal” can put on a kid is real. Call it “prom-pressure” if you will. But if your teen is already freaking out about SAT scores, fall sports and college applications, do they really need to wrack their brains over creating the perfect, creative, over-the-top “promposal”? Probably not. And then there’s the fact that the teen being asked to the prom via such an elaborate method may also feel stressed — and feel pressured to say yes when they don’t want to (especially since most of this prom craziness is broadcasted live over social media, naturally).

    So, parents: Sit your teen down, and talk about promposals already. (Just when you thought the awkward kid talk about sex was well in the past, you now have prom pressure to address, sorry.) Whether your teen is considering one or may fall victim to the spontaneous proposal, establishing your expectations may be helpful to avoid strife — or mutual financial implosion. This can be the ideal time to model how you manage your own funds, and teach your kids how to save money — which is, after all, a lifelong lesson.

    The most important thing as prom approaches: Don’t ruin yourself financially just trying to please your teen. Of course we want them to have a good time. But we also want what’s best for them, which probably includes things like keeping a roof over their heads and perhaps a college fund. Don’t let them think that you’re obligated to spend thousands to send them to college and fund a “promposal” to boot. It’s not a need; it’s a want. And it’s your choice to make together, even if you establish that you’re not contributing a dime to the whole wacky endeavor.

    https://www.yahoo.com/now/promposals-everything-thats-wrong-teen-200027353.html
  • LeccaLecca Posts: 126 Member
    When I was in high school (9 years ago) promposals were definitely a thing. How elaborate they were really depended on the person. For me, my boyfriend at the time gave me a little hand written note with a drawing of a whale that said “whale you go to prom with me”. It was sweet and simple.

    When I had a prom themed birthday last year (an excuse to rewear a bridesmaid dress lmao) I made my girlfriend a note that said “I’d be the luckiest pumpkin in the patch if you picked me for prom” and gave her a tiny pumpkin. She had never had a promposal in high school and she loved it.
  • AncientMuseAncientMuse Posts: 1,062 Member
    edited July 2022
    DaWaterRat wrote: »
    Atreya33 wrote: »
    Just out of curiosity : are proposals actually a thing in the US? It seems a bit hard to believe people would actually kneel in front of some one like that in a full school hallway.

    Promposals have become a huge thing. I think they're cringeworthy, because they put extra pressure on the askee to say yes - kinda like those elaborate wedding proposals.

    I was helping my kid's drama club her senior year and one kid had arranged with the director to "skip ahead" in the planned rehearsal so that he could ask a girl to homecoming as part of the scene.

    40 years ago, if a lad wanted to ask one of us gals to a school dance or whatever, he always dared one of his buddies to go up to her and ask on his behalf.... so he didn't have to risk the embarrassment of being rejected directly.

    A friend in need is a friend indeed. :D
    My Gallery ID: AncientMuse2
    "Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect." ~ Mark Twain
  • WispyeWispye Posts: 141 Member
    i can't wait it looks awesome
  • MoonlightGrahamMoonlightGraham Posts: 884 Member
    Promposals are definitely a thing, and they can be extravagant. The older kids at the school where I teach seem to be less outrageous than the ones described in the article @simgirl1010 posted.

    The older boys, most of whom I've taught, don't seem to stress over promposals very much. They'll make a poster with a silly poem on it and approach their prospective date in the hallway. One guy learned to bake chocolate chip cookies and presented a girl with them, after finding out from a friend what kind she liked best. It seems most of the "promposers" know they'll get the answer they want, because they ask someone with whom they're already in a relationship.

    I had a conversation about this with a girl whom both my wife and I had taught. When she was a few years older, she was our daughter's "lady's companion" (sitter). She told me her prom date had simply walked up to her as she was heading to a class, smiled, and said "I'd really like to take you to Prom. Would you please go to Prom with me?" She said that was much, much better than an elaborate, staged "production."

    Exie hay, cavero, veebo marz viremzico.
    Exie hay, cavero, mabza meeah vendarzo.
    Yevsas mairzeemo!
  • DaWaterRatDaWaterRat Posts: 3,353 Member
    I went to both my Junior Prom and my Senior prom, but wasn't really asked either time. :wink:

    Junior year, I and my boyfriend went as covert "bodyguards" for a friend (who had graduated) who didn't really want to go with the guy who asked her, but she felt bad for him and it was his Senior Prom. We wound up "kidnapping" another friend who was there under similar circumstances and ditching prom all together (with my friend's "date") to go tree climbing in the park.

    Senior year, my friends and I kinda decided as a group that yes, we were going because it was Senior prom and it was a thing. We again cut out after dinner, because we didn't like the crowds... or the band. This time we went over to a friend's house to hang out and talk Dr Who and Star Trek for a few hours.
  • ignominiusrexignominiusrex Posts: 2,680 Member
    Zussage wrote: »
    I'm a bit nervous if this is the pack. I'm from the group of people that want a Generations EP. A High School EP does sound like it will include some of the stuff I'm missing - More content for family play and younger sims. But it seems a bit much to have an entire EP just centered on High School? I could see a GP maybe but what is this going to be stuffed with to make High School feel full? And what kind of World is it gonna be? Am I only gonna be able to do all this stuff in the one world, and does it mean all my family gameplay is limited to the one map if I want the benefit it gives teens? And then what if they do an Elementary EP, do I have to pick which age of sims I cater to based on which map I choose?

    It's a lot of content to fill to justify the cost. A High-School EP would only be for teens, not even all school ages, and would it only be school related content at that? It could give us some great stuff like Prom, home school options, private school options, more extra curriculars for teens, maybe a new hobby, but how much of it is going to be filler or just over what people asked cause it's centered around such a niche theme. Like, I don't need University Junior. If the gameplay is too similar it's gonna feel redundant and stale. I want my teen play to have depth in general, I don't just want to play at High School over and over again before heading to University to do more of the same.

    It also scares me that they're separating out what could be a Generations pack into multiple packs while simultaneously missing the point of what a Generations pack is. It means instead of buying a few focused family-play packs, I'm gonna have to buy multiple EP's, GP's, SP's and Kits... Just to get a few crucial items and be left with a lot of filler. Yes I'd love to see some more teen content and high-school improvements, but does it need a whole EP to itself? And will it build up teen play in general or just in relation to high-school? I don't want to have to buy the High School Pack, then the Elementary pack, then Elder Care Home pack, then the Teen Hobby pack, then Kid Imagination pack, etc. By separating all this out, they also miss out on what family-play is: it's how sims interact across the generations with each other. A teen-centric pack might help the teen problem, but it doesn't help the interactive family play. I want family trees improved, and family relationships expanded, and interactions between siblings and grandparents highlighted. I don't want to buy a dozen packs and still never have my sims acknowledge they have an aunt.

    I think we all know that's exactly what they will do because that's exactly what they have done to date.

    All the packs in Sims3 were huge by comparison: huge worlds, and the content of several Sims4 packs, each.

    I was shocked when I found this out, that in Sims3, you get several major packs plus a string of minor ones from Sims4, rolled into each and every pack. Or put more correctly, it's that in Sims4, things that went into Sims3 packs were parceled out, divided up, and sold in little bunches strung out over long periods of time so the audience would get thirsty enough between releases, to buy anything.

    I'm still really excited about the High School pack, but your mentioning that it won't include Elementary school or anything besides teens, did make me feel a bit disappointed, because I hadn't thought of that.

    On the bright side, in Sims3, elementary and high school were both just rabbitholes. In this, you actually have a location and interactions.
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  • ignominiusrexignominiusrex Posts: 2,680 Member
    Interesting article.

    The "Promposal" Is Everything That's Wrong With 2020 Teens & It Needs to Stop

    Sure, once upon a time, it was cute. Maybe you’d see a teenage boy run across a field hockey turf holding a poster that said “PROM?” written in a Sharpie. Sure, it was a creative way to ask his prospective date if they would go to the big event with him. But my, how the mighty-cute have fallen. These days, promposals have turned into a hassle, an extravagance, and an epic expense — especially for parents. And it’s this here parent’s opinion that “promposals” need to stop.

    First, there’s the financial factor. Somehow, “promposals” have become a rich kid’s game, with every “promposing” teen trying to one-up the next one in the opulence of their gesture — which has turned into some hefty spending in many cases. (Yes, teens have hired skywriters to post the four-letter question, and have called on celebrities to help them with the “big ask.”)

    In 2015, Visa estimated that the average American household spent $324 on promposals. As in, that’s what it costs just to ask another person to the dance. That doesn’t include the tickets, the dress, the dinner, the limo, or whatever else it takes to show up in style these days (something tells me that includes a lot more now than it did when I prommed it up in 1996.) And even if you, the parent, are not draining your own bank account in hopes that your kid will avoid teenage rejection overload, you may not want your child spending their hard-earned after-school-job money on a promposal either. Why? Because it’s an unnecessary extravagance. Right? (“Wrong,” your teen may likely contend. “It’s a societal norm.” Yikes.)

    Most parents want to help their children go to the prom, but finding money for things like a tuxedo rental or gown is stressful enough without a “promposal” to fund. But if parents think this is the moment they’ll teach their “promposing” kid the value of a dollar when they’re hellbent on an over-the-top “promposal” plus prom night with all the trimmings? Good luck. In fact, prom may end up needing to be the first time you and your child have to sit down to create a budget. Personally, I’d rather save that pivotal parent-teen discussion for trying to save for college. (Do they realize that’s right around the corner, too?)

    According to Visa, it costs $919 per couple on average to go to the prom. If teens — and/or their parents — are spending hundreds of dollars just asking the question, how much will they fork over for dresses, tuxes, flowers, limos and God-knows-what-else they do afterward?

    Yet another reason why promposals may drive you — and your teen — nuts? The stress a “promposal” can put on a kid is real. Call it “prom-pressure” if you will. But if your teen is already freaking out about SAT scores, fall sports and college applications, do they really need to wrack their brains over creating the perfect, creative, over-the-top “promposal”? Probably not. And then there’s the fact that the teen being asked to the prom via such an elaborate method may also feel stressed — and feel pressured to say yes when they don’t want to (especially since most of this prom craziness is broadcasted live over social media, naturally).

    So, parents: Sit your teen down, and talk about promposals already. (Just when you thought the awkward kid talk about sex was well in the past, you now have prom pressure to address, sorry.) Whether your teen is considering one or may fall victim to the spontaneous proposal, establishing your expectations may be helpful to avoid strife — or mutual financial implosion. This can be the ideal time to model how you manage your own funds, and teach your kids how to save money — which is, after all, a lifelong lesson.

    The most important thing as prom approaches: Don’t ruin yourself financially just trying to please your teen. Of course we want them to have a good time. But we also want what’s best for them, which probably includes things like keeping a roof over their heads and perhaps a college fund. Don’t let them think that you’re obligated to spend thousands to send them to college and fund a “promposal” to boot. It’s not a need; it’s a want. And it’s your choice to make together, even if you establish that you’re not contributing a dime to the whole wacky endeavor.

    https://www.yahoo.com/now/promposals-everything-thats-wrong-teen-200027353.html

    wow, thanks for sharing that. I'm sure as heck glad they weren't a thing when I was in high school.

    Prom was bad enough as a boiler room of unrealistic expectations and pressure to appear as if none of it were an unmanageable financial burden on the families, back then, and apparently the mad dash for performative displays of extravagance, particularly when you can't afford it, has gone wild.

    Everything that is now necessary to be popular, is gatekept by being expensive. In the US, the only kids who get to participate in school extracurricular activities, are those whose parents can afford all the uniforms, equipment, instruments, fees, travel expenses, that extracurriculars incur, and are not covered by the school even though they could be, if we as a society agreed that making extracurricular activities equally available to all students, was a requirement of public schools, and supported it with public funds.

    People talk a lot, often admiringly, about students who are involved in school activities but no one mentions that it's only because of relative privilege that they can. Poor students will also often skip prom out of shame, unless it's an overall "poor school" and enough other kids won't be able to spend extravagantly either.
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  • telemwilltelemwill Posts: 1,752 Member
    Interesting article.

    The "Promposal" Is Everything That's Wrong With 2020 Teens & It Needs to Stop

    Sure, once upon a time, it was cute. Maybe you’d see a teenage boy run across a field hockey turf holding a poster that said “PROM?” written in a Sharpie. Sure, it was a creative way to ask his prospective date if they would go to the big event with him. But my, how the mighty-cute have fallen. These days, promposals have turned into a hassle, an extravagance, and an epic expense — especially for parents. And it’s this here parent’s opinion that “promposals” need to stop.

    First, there’s the financial factor. Somehow, “promposals” have become a rich kid’s game, with every “promposing” teen trying to one-up the next one in the opulence of their gesture — which has turned into some hefty spending in many cases. (Yes, teens have hired skywriters to post the four-letter question, and have called on celebrities to help them with the “big ask.”)

    In 2015, Visa estimated that the average American household spent $324 on promposals. As in, that’s what it costs just to ask another person to the dance. That doesn’t include the tickets, the dress, the dinner, the limo, or whatever else it takes to show up in style these days (something tells me that includes a lot more now than it did when I prommed it up in 1996.) And even if you, the parent, are not draining your own bank account in hopes that your kid will avoid teenage rejection overload, you may not want your child spending their hard-earned after-school-job money on a promposal either. Why? Because it’s an unnecessary extravagance. Right? (“Wrong,” your teen may likely contend. “It’s a societal norm.” Yikes.)

    Most parents want to help their children go to the prom, but finding money for things like a tuxedo rental or gown is stressful enough without a “promposal” to fund. But if parents think this is the moment they’ll teach their “promposing” kid the value of a dollar when they’re hellbent on an over-the-top “promposal” plus prom night with all the trimmings? Good luck. In fact, prom may end up needing to be the first time you and your child have to sit down to create a budget. Personally, I’d rather save that pivotal parent-teen discussion for trying to save for college. (Do they realize that’s right around the corner, too?)

    According to Visa, it costs $919 per couple on average to go to the prom. If teens — and/or their parents — are spending hundreds of dollars just asking the question, how much will they fork over for dresses, tuxes, flowers, limos and God-knows-what-else they do afterward?

    Yet another reason why promposals may drive you — and your teen — nuts? The stress a “promposal” can put on a kid is real. Call it “prom-pressure” if you will. But if your teen is already freaking out about SAT scores, fall sports and college applications, do they really need to wrack their brains over creating the perfect, creative, over-the-top “promposal”? Probably not. And then there’s the fact that the teen being asked to the prom via such an elaborate method may also feel stressed — and feel pressured to say yes when they don’t want to (especially since most of this prom craziness is broadcasted live over social media, naturally).

    So, parents: Sit your teen down, and talk about promposals already. (Just when you thought the awkward kid talk about sex was well in the past, you now have prom pressure to address, sorry.) Whether your teen is considering one or may fall victim to the spontaneous proposal, establishing your expectations may be helpful to avoid strife — or mutual financial implosion. This can be the ideal time to model how you manage your own funds, and teach your kids how to save money — which is, after all, a lifelong lesson.

    The most important thing as prom approaches: Don’t ruin yourself financially just trying to please your teen. Of course we want them to have a good time. But we also want what’s best for them, which probably includes things like keeping a roof over their heads and perhaps a college fund. Don’t let them think that you’re obligated to spend thousands to send them to college and fund a “promposal” to boot. It’s not a need; it’s a want. And it’s your choice to make together, even if you establish that you’re not contributing a dime to the whole wacky endeavor.

    https://www.yahoo.com/now/promposals-everything-thats-wrong-teen-200027353.html

    wow, thanks for sharing that. I'm sure as heck glad they weren't a thing when I was in high school.

    Prom was bad enough as a boiler room of unrealistic expectations and pressure to appear as if none of it were an unmanageable financial burden on the families, back then, and apparently the mad dash for performative displays of extravagance, particularly when you can't afford it, has gone wild.

    Everything that is now necessary to be popular, is gatekept by being expensive. In the US, the only kids who get to participate in school extracurricular activities, are those whose parents can afford all the uniforms, equipment, instruments, fees, travel expenses, that extracurriculars incur, and are not covered by the school even though they could be, if we as a society agreed that making extracurricular activities equally available to all students, was a requirement of public schools, and supported it with public funds.

    People talk a lot, often admiringly, about students who are involved in school activities but no one mentions that it's only because of relative privilege that they can. Poor students will also often skip prom out of shame, unless it's an overall "poor school" and enough other kids won't be able to spend extravagantly either.

    My Mom's church has a program where teens can get donated prom dresses for free. They have people who donate time to adjust them for size even.
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